The Vortex Razor Gen II 4.5-27×56

At one end, I had the Sightron III – a scope that gets a pile of great reviews – with people often calling it one of the best scopes available for the money. At the other end of the scale, I had my eyes on an S&B PMii 5-25 – really, still the gold standard for scopes of this type. However, I was still looking at close to 1.5k more than the eventual price I paid for the Vortex Razor Gen II 4.5-27×56.

The Vortex Razor Gen II 4.5-27×56

If you have been following the PRS at all, then it’s going to be hard to not be familiar with the Vortex. It’s still one of the most popular scopes out there in the long range game, so I wasn’t overly worried about being disappointed with my purchase.

Vortex Razor Gen II 4.5-27x56 with EBR-2c ReticleIt’s a unit, that is for sure. The one word I use most often to describe the scope is, heavy.

However, that weight is a result of the scope being built like a tank – and as a result, I have zero worries about the scope being knocked out of shape during heavy use. My scope now has a couple of decent scuffs on it – a result of shooting through a fork in a tree – but the unit didn’t shift a bit, nor require any adjustments – it just works!

Reticle Choices

I ended up going for the EBR-2C Reticle. I was keen on trying out a ‘Christmas tree’ style reticle – but didn’t want to go down the path of a Horus, and its ‘imperial basis’. The 2C is MilRad – so each major mark represents 1 mil, or 10cm at 100m. Makes sense to my mind and matches up with what most of the shooters around me are using.

Features

While things like reticle illumination, are still not really something I use often, zero-stop is pretty much on the ‘must have’ list for me know.

The scope has solid, lockable turrets – and it is often the case that I will just leave the wind alone (I use the reticle for wind holds normally) and pop up the elevation dial. It’s solid enough that I can generally leave it ‘open’ all day and not have to worry about it getting altered or knocked1.

I also picked up the quick throw level for the scope – while the zoom ring is usable – certainly, having the quick throw on there is a requirement for quick multiple target transitions or dialing out to find the target, before zooming back in before setting up for the shot.

My one bugbear

Has to be – the zeroing system.

While, theoretically, I understand and appreciate the non-clicking nature of the zero adjustments (you loosen up the turret, then can freely adjust the zero) – I have found that means it’s a bit fiddly and requires tools. It’s not a killer, and I don’t have a suggestion for a better method, but it would be one my criticism of the system.

However

Overall I am very happy with this scope. It may not live on this rifle permanently – as I have come to the conclusion it still is probably a bit ‘too much’ scope for this rifle – but in the meantime – every time I get behind it to shoot – I am confident that where the reticle is pointed, the bullet will go!

At one end, I had the Sightron III - a scope that gets a pile of great reviews - with people often calling it one of the best scopes available for the money. At the other end of the scale, I had my eyes on an S&B PMii 5-25 - really, still the gold standard for scopes of this type. However, I was still looking at close to 1.5k more than the eventual price I paid for the Vortex Razor Gen II 4.5-27x56. The Vortex Razor Gen II 4.5-27x56 If you have been following the PRS at all, then it's going to…
A phenomenal piece of glass - it's heavy, but there is a reason for it!

Vortex Razor Gen II 4.5-27×56

Build Quality - 100%
Ease of Use - 73%
Feature Set - 82%
'Fit for Purpose' - 100%
Value - 87%

88%

A phenomenal piece of glass - it's heavy, but there is a reason for it!

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  1. though, good practice is to check your dials every time you get behind the rifle anyhow 

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